Photo Set

architags:

Gres House. Luciano Kruk. Itauna. Brasil. under construction. images (c) Luciano Kruk

(via archi-diary)

Source: architags
Photo
cjwho:

Vienna State Opera by Christoph Sevcnikar

The building was the first major building on the Vienna Ringstraße commissioned by the Viennese “city expansion fund”. Work commenced on the building in 1861 and was completed in 1869, following plans drawn up by architects August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll. It was built in the Neo-Renaissance style.

The Ministry of the Interior had commissioned a number of reports into the availability of certain building materials, with the result that stones long not seen in Vienna were used, such as Wöllersdorfer Stein, for plinths and free-standing, simply-divided buttresses, the famously hard stone from Kaisersteinbruch, whose colour was more appropriate than that of Kelheimerstein, for more lushly decorated parts. The somewhat coarser-grained Kelheimerstein (also known as Solnhof Plattenstein) was intended as the main stone to be used in the building of the opera house, but the necessary quantity was not deliverable. Breitenbrunner stone was suggested as a substitute for the Kelheimer stone, and stone from Jois was used as a cheaper alternative to the Kaiserstein. The staircases were constructed from polished Kaiserstein, while most of the rest of the interior was decorated with varieties of marble.

The decision was made to use dimension stone for the exterior of the building. Due to the monumental demand for stone, stone from Sóskút, widely used in Budapest, was also used. Three Viennese masonry companies were employed to supply enough masonry labour: Eduard Hauser (still in existence today), Anton Wasserburger and Moritz Pranter. The foundation stone was laid on 20 May 1863.

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cjwho:

Vienna State Opera by Christoph Sevcnikar

The building was the first major building on the Vienna Ringstraße commissioned by the Viennese “city expansion fund”. Work commenced on the building in 1861 and was completed in 1869, following plans drawn up by architects August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Nüll. It was built in the Neo-Renaissance style.

The Ministry of the Interior had commissioned a number of reports into the availability of certain building materials, with the result that stones long not seen in Vienna were used, such as Wöllersdorfer Stein, for plinths and free-standing, simply-divided buttresses, the famously hard stone from Kaisersteinbruch, whose colour was more appropriate than that of Kelheimerstein, for more lushly decorated parts. The somewhat coarser-grained Kelheimerstein (also known as Solnhof Plattenstein) was intended as the main stone to be used in the building of the opera house, but the necessary quantity was not deliverable. Breitenbrunner stone was suggested as a substitute for the Kelheimer stone, and stone from Jois was used as a cheaper alternative to the Kaiserstein. The staircases were constructed from polished Kaiserstein, while most of the rest of the interior was decorated with varieties of marble.

The decision was made to use dimension stone for the exterior of the building. Due to the monumental demand for stone, stone from Sóskút, widely used in Budapest, was also used. Three Viennese masonry companies were employed to supply enough masonry labour: Eduard Hauser (still in existence today), Anton Wasserburger and Moritz Pranter. The foundation stone was laid on 20 May 1863.

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Source: cjwho
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nonconcept:

"The Grounds" Restaurant by Caroline Choker, Alexandria, Australia.

(via nonconcept)

Source: nonconcept
Photo

nonconcept:

I would like to have such staircase in my house. Damn

Source: luxuryon
Photo
Photo Set

cjwho:

Narigua House, Mexico by David Pedroza Castañeda | via

Completed by David Pedroza Castañeda architects in 2013, the Nirigua House is a colossal residence in Mexico covering 8,000 square-feet. Built up in the mountainous woodlands, the home offers spectacular 360º views of the beautiful landscape while simultaneously respecting the existing ecosystem.

To preserve the existing greenery, a floor plan was devised with various different “zones” that group around the old cedar trees. The first zone contains the garage and storage spaces. The entrance hall, master bedroom, and staircase to the lower level are all located in the second volume, and the third features the kitchen and social area. The building material selection also help the building to blend into its surroundings, with copper and stained wood making for a rustic aesthetic.

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Source: cjwho
Photo Set

spacetravelco:

Scientific engravings from 1850

by John Philipps Emslie

(via the Wellcome Collection)

Source: spacetravelco
Photo

nonconcept:

The Adelaide Zoo ~ Entrance by Studio Hassell.

Source: archdaily.com
Photo Set
Photo Set

cjwho:

Narigua House, Mexico by David Pedroza Castañeda | via

Completed by David Pedroza Castañeda architects in 2013, the Nirigua House is a colossal residence in Mexico covering 8,000 square-feet. Built up in the mountainous woodlands, the home offers spectacular 360º views of the beautiful landscape while simultaneously respecting the existing ecosystem.

To preserve the existing greenery, a floor plan was devised with various different “zones” that group around the old cedar trees. The first zone contains the garage and storage spaces. The entrance hall, master bedroom, and staircase to the lower level are all located in the second volume, and the third features the kitchen and social area. The building material selection also help the building to blend into its surroundings, with copper and stained wood making for a rustic aesthetic.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

Source: cjwho